Susan Graham                                                      
  Sculpture       Photography      Installation

EXHIBITIONS / CV

NEWS

PRESS

VIDEO CLIPS

CONTACT INFORMATION


WORKS                        

LUX ART INSTITUTE

NEW GARDENS

DISASTER FOLLOWED...

INSOMNIA


DAD'S GUN COLLECTION

BEAUTIFUL OHIO

DRIFT SUPER-8


A UNIVERSE WITHOUT...

EDITIONS

PUBLIC WORKS

WORLD TRADE CENTER









  

August 19. 2001

The Aesthetic Bounty of Night and Day

by Helen A. Harrison, New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/19/nyregion/art-reviews-the-aesthetic-bounty-of-night-and-day.html


What the show's title has to do with its content -- nine pieces, only two of which might be considered pictures -- is a mystery. With one exception, the seven artists are essentially sculptors, or at least they create three-dimensional objects rather than pictorial imagery. The unifying factor actually seems to be the incongruous use of materials. Visitors are advised to ignore the confusion and concentrate on the works themselves, for there is some fascinating work in this small, handsome show, which inaugurates the newly renovated gallery.

The most disconcerting transformation is Susan Graham's use of icing sugar to render a pair of handguns. Accurately configured but skeletal, the pistols have been turned from lethal weapons into sweet confections -- a disarming move in both senses of the term. In ''Nest,'' Daren Kendall upends a cluster of wrestling trophy figures to fashion a sculpture that clings to a corner like a wasp's nest, conjuring the organic from the metallic. As with Jil Weinstock's row of zippers cast into a strip of transparent rubber, the original components are undisguised, making their metamorphosis all the more remarkable.


Inserting one's face into Nick Tarr's mirrored dioramas of animal skulls and toy figures brings to mind Orwell's rat-cage mask from ''1984.'' Here at least the viewer finds only inanimate, if creepy, artifacts, except for the reflected eyes taking it all in. Ruby Jackson's reeflike environments are more welcoming; her ''Tropical Triptych'' of polymer clay suggests aquariums suitable for exotic fish or adventurous miniature divers.


The puzzle-piece ingredients of Al Souza's ''Topsy-Turvy'' are a familiar form of image fragmentation, but his jigsawed views are reorganized abstractly, making nonsense of the impulse to sort out the jumbled visual information. This is the show's most pictorial work, although Dominique Figarella's ''Slip?'' might be considered a drawing, if a plumber's helper can be imagined as a graphic tool.


 

"Susan Graham residency at Lux has memorable outcome"

Written by James Chute, U-T San Diego, October 12, 2012

"An Interview with Susan Graham"

Robin Tung, DAILYSERVING, October 12, 2012

"Susan Graham: Artist Uses Porcelain, Sugar to Make Industrial Goods Seem Dainty"

Lillian Cox, EncinitasPatch, October 12, 2012

"Dark and Light Combine in Brooklyn Sculptor’s Work at Lux"

by Patricia Morris Buckley, North County Times, October 2, 2012

"Sweet and Scary at Lux Art Institute"

by James Chute, U-T San Diego, October 2, 2012

"When Bad is Good: Creativity and the Downturn"

by Claire Lieberman, Art Experience NYC, September 5, 2011

"This Week: Must-See Arts in the City"

Carolina A. Miranda, WNYC.org, April 21, 2011


"Brooklyn Local"

by Emily Nathan, Artnet.com, January 2011

"Sweet Seduction in Varied Forms"

by John Goodrich, New York Sun, August 2, 2007

"Dateline Brooklyn-A Stereoscpoic Vision"

by Stephen Maine, Artnet.com, August, 2004

"ART/ARCHITECTURE; Power and Glory in Sisterhood"

 by Edward M. Gomez, New York Times, October 13, 2002

"Sci-Fi and Gardens"

  by William Powhida, The Brooklyn Rail, Autumn 2002

"The Aesthetic Bounty of Night and Day"

 by Helen A. Harrison, New York Times,  August 19, 2001